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A definitive ranking of the most interesting Mavericks at summer league

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Dallas has one of their best summer league teams in a few years. With roster spots to fill, could one of the non-roster players make the team?

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13. McKenzie Moore

12. Isaiah Miles

11. Jonathan Gibson

10. Jameel Warney

I don't know anything about these dudes.

9. Chane Behanan

8. Giovan Oniangue

I don't know anything about these dudes either, but they have better names.

7. Kyle Collinsworth

I remember Collinsworth when Jimmer mania was a thing. He was a freshman role player then, but he evolved into a 6'6 starting point guard for BYU. That size is his best attribute, since he's able to fill up a stat sheet with points, rebounds and assists. His overall offensive game is problematic, though: his ball handling is average, he's not great at finishing around the basket and his jumper has really never come together, making only 26 threes in his college career.

6. Satnam Singh

Singh has a very neat story as the first Indian-born player to be drafted, but his great NBA size comes with not-NBA speed. We'll see whether he has a future when he gets real minutes with players who will be on the Mavs' roster next year.

5. Perry Ellis

Ellis is a power forward who can hit threes and guard big men, but there's not really much more he does beyond that. You probably know him as the dude who looked really old and spent three hundred* years at Kansas. (*Approximate figure)

4. Vander Blue

The Mavericks like Blue, a 23-year-old who played at Marquette a few seasons ago. He still hasn't had a real shot in the NBA, and Dallas probably isn't the place for him either with their surplus of guards, but he has been a dominant scorer in the D-League.

3. Dorian Finney-Smith

Finney-Smith just got one of those three-year partial guarantees from the Mavericks -- basically, an non-guaranteed deal, but they threw in $300,000 for motivation. Finney-Smith really looks like he could be a 3-and-D role player, with 41 percent shooting on five attempts last year while defending three positions well. Finney-Smith's game  The contract proves Dallas has similar thoughts, but we'll see if it pans out for him.

2. A.J. Hammons

There's a lot to like from Hammons, even if offensive post-game is growing more outdated in today's NBA. He's an athlete with size who can block shots and rebounds. After four years at Purdue, Hammons should dominate this mismatch of talent who is mostly not as physical as him.

1. Justin Anderson

Dallas is going to have Anderson with the ball in his hands a lot throughout summer league. That's something that has never been a strength for him, and clearly he projects more as a weak-side three-and-D player, but the ability to run a few weak-side pick-and-rolls after primary action breaks down would be exception for him.

Beyond that, you'd like to see Anderson shoot well and block everything and not get injured.